Holiday Safety: Avoid Halloween Decorations Hazards

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Halloween decorations

Your Halloween decorations might be considered the best, the scariest or even the most realistic looking.

But are they the safest?

Jack-o’-lanterns should always be illuminated with flameless candles, or even glow sticks, because of the fire risk presented by burning candles.

If light strands or electrical cords are thrown into trees or vegetation near power lines or placed on utility poles, they aren’t. If highly flammable decorations like cornstalks and ghosts are left too close to heat sources like incandescent lightbulbs, they’re not. And, if combustible items like spider webs and goblins are placed too close to burning candles, they most certainly are not.

To avoid hazardous counterfeits, the only electrical decorations that should be used are those bearing the labels of trusted independent safety organizations like Underwriters Laboratories (UL), Intertek and CSA. Credit: Sally Jeun

With candles and decorations very high on the list of the $9 billion in Halloween spending expected this year and more than 175 million Americans likely to participate in the festivities, Southern California Edison (SCE) joins public safety experts nationwide in encouraging smart and careful decisions with decorations, candles and costumes to avoid electrical and fire accidents.

Electrical lights and cords should be carefully inspected before installation and any with broken bulbs or damaged wires should be discarded.
Credit: Sally Jeun

“We want families and celebrants to enjoy their decorations as safely as possible,” said Andrew S. Martinez, SCE’s vice president of Safety, Security and Business Resiliency. “For example, jack-o’-lanterns should always be illuminated with flameless candles. Actually, they’re ideal for all decorations since they provide the same effect as burning candles and, most importantly, they are not a fire hazard.”

Flameless candles can look and even smell like burning candles and, most significantly, carry no fire hazard.

That fire hazard is epitomized by Halloween being among the highest days annually for candle fires and that candles ignite 41 percent of the estimated 860 yearly home decoration fires (excluding Christmas trees).

Candles, however, are only one of the many potential hazards posed by installing and maintaining decorations this Halloween. SCE offers additional dos and don’ts on decorating safely around electricity.

Infographic: Larry Tsuei

DECORATING DOS:

  • Always look up and look out for power lines when decorating outside and always stay at least 10 feet away from them.
  • Carefully inspect electrical lights and cords, discarding any with broken bulbs or damaged wires.
  • Consider LED lights that generate less heat and are far more efficient.
    Use plastic zip cords when hanging lights instead of staples, tacks and nails.
  • Keep highly flammable decorations like cornstalks and ghosts at least three feet away from heat sources like space heaters.

DECORATING DON’TS:

  • Avoid overloading extension cords. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for use of extension cords and connection of strands of light.
  • Never connect two extension cords to extend their length and never place them in pinched positions.
  • Look out for unsafe electrical decorations by using only those bearing the labels of trusted independent safety organizations like Underwriters Laboratories (UL), Intertek or CSA.
  • Never use electrical products outdoors that are marked “for indoor use”.
  • Never leave decorations on when leaving home or going to bed.

“You should always choose your decorations with safety in mind,” said Martinez. “Smart planning and careful placement of those decorations are the best preparation for a fun and safe Halloween.”

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Holiday Safety: Avoid Halloween Decorations Hazards
Article Name
Holiday Safety: Avoid Halloween Decorations Hazards
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Your Halloween decorations might be considered the best, the scariest or even the most realistic looking. But are they the safest?
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LAWestMedia.com